View single post by bear
 Posted: Thu Apr 18th, 2013 05:13 pm
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bear

 

Joined: Thu Nov 15th, 2012
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Mana: 
Truth is single even in terms of quantum non-locality.

Sergey, I have never even heard the word Quantum nonlocality so I looked it up on wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_nonlocality is the phenomenon by which the measurements made at a microscopic level necessarily refute one or more notions (often referred to as local realism) that are regarded as intuitively true in classical mechanics. Rigorously, quantum nonlocality refers to quantum mechanical predictions of many-system measurement correlations that cannot be simulated by any local hidden variable theory. Many entangled quantum states produce such correlations when measured, as demonstrated by Bell's theorem.
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I bearly even know what all that means and I suppose I could read it 3 more times to try to let it sink in, but at the moment I am not interested in what it means because I am going to give you 4 absoulte truths:

I am a Sister
I am a Wife
I am a Mother
I am a Daughter

Why does microscopic measurement have to be the determination of absolute truth?

OK so I go back and look at the wiki article. I can't even understand the supposed experiment. It is too much for my chemo laden, 50 year old, unexercised brain to keep straight. And I do not have the desire to try to figure it out. I suppose that is quantum physics stuff? I don't even know what that is. Really, I don't even know what quantum is. I guess I might look up that word to see.

And after that self-debasing sentance I decided to go and look at the answer to the quiz:

2 + 2 = 11 is true in ternary (base-3) numeral system
Such is a system when you use just 3 numbers for counting, unlike common 10. In ternary system counting from 0 to 10 looks like this:

0, 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 100, 101

So, naturally, in this system 2 + 2 = 4, you just write 4 in a different way. The fun part is that it is generally assumed


No, I would have never gotten the answer, never, in a million years. I know nothing about ternary counting systems. But I am inspired to ask. What is the value of 0? Is it truley 0 or is it 1? Why? Says Who?